Losing a parent

Losing a parent

Losing a parent can be one of the most traumatic experiences you will ever face. While some factors may make the grief process more complex, such as unresolved conflict with the parent, or the way in which the parent died, the loss of a parent has a lasting impact in your life. In some situations, this grief may lead to...[ read more ]

7 Mistakes that people make when a child dies

It inconceivable. The pain that a parent experiences when their child dies. There are no adequate words to describe what they are going through or how deeply their emotions run. Parents who have lost a child find themselves in a canyon of immense sadness.  Friends, family members, teachers, coaches and peers struggle as they want to provide comfort. Being available,...[ read more ]

Should my child see a therapist?

Knowing if you should take your child in to see a therapist can be very challenging. Especially when it comes to young children who don’t have the emotional or communication skills to verbalize what they need or how they’re feeling. Therapy can be very helpful for kids. It can teach children healthy coping skills,  how to understand, articulate and express...[ read more ]

New guidelines for depression screenings for children 12-17

It’s not easy to talk about depression, yet the problem is fairly common. Only about 50 percent of adolescents with depression are diagnosed before reaching adulthood. During the teenage years, there’s about a 20 percent chance of having depression or anxiety, research suggests. Suicide remains the leading cause of death for children aged 10 to 17. This week the American Academy...[ read more ]

Teen suicide-risk and protective factors

“Temperament, family and community all have a role” according to Dr. Nadine Kaslow. In her article, Dr. Kaslow explores the risk and protective factors of teen suicide. Risk factors are things that increase the likelihood that a child will engage in suicidal behavior and the protective factors are things that reduce the risk. Risk factors: A recent or serious loss....[ read more ]

The Grieving Need You Most After the Funeral

John Pavlovitz recently wrote an article that has been making its way around Facebook. John’s article talks about the support that people need after they experience a loss. He talks about how people are very present immediately after a loss, and that they continue to be supportive and helpful up until the funeral. After the funeral, there is a significant...[ read more ]

Talking to children about mass shootings

A colleague wrote this article today about talking with your children about mass shootings. Never a topic any parent wanted to have to discuss but we can’t afford not to. Our children need to be heard, and to feel understood.   The post Talking to children about mass shootings appeared first on Mountain View Therapy.

Speaking of the unmentionable

“What really happened to grandma” asks your child after your mother, your child’s grandmother, died in a recent car accident. What happened is that grandma failed to yield a 4-way stop and was hit by another car, resulting in severe head trauma and ultimately a brain hemorrhage. Grandma died in an ambulance, on the way to the hospital.     “Talking...[ read more ]

The real stages of grief…

There are many misconceptions about the grief cycle and the stages of grief. This visual humorously, yet honestly, illuminates the discrepancies. When grieving there is no template, no order, and no right or wrong way to be experienced. Unfortunately, there are many resources out there, websites and books, that suggest that there is in fact a proper way to experience...[ read more ]

Self care tips during mourning

After the loss of a loved one, you will need time to grieve and heal. You will also need to care for yourself throughout the grief process. It is important that you give yourself permission to engage in self care. You are not able to take care of others, until you have taken care of yourself. Self care is not...[ read more ]